Human contact removed from employment process

Tue 4th of September 2012, filed under SEO

Changing face of employment puts robots in charge

Job interviews may soon be conducted in a virtual environment, as major companies move away from the traditional interview process. One of the methods becoming more prevalent involves putting candidates into a computer generated scenario to test their knowledge and experience.

It emerged recently that O2 were using a 'talent consultancy' group, which puts job hopefuls into a virtual situation where they will be approached for mobile phone advice from various computer generated characters. In addition to this they are also tested with questions that test attitudes to various other situations, such as a special offer or business opportunity. The whole purpose of this is to quickly determine who is suitable to progress to the next step of the employment process without costly face to face meetings.

The organisation behind this particular example are The Chemistry Group, who say their intention is "to create opportunities for everyone to be brilliant at work" and boast a wide range of large clients including O2, Yell, BP, Vodafone and Harrods. This suggests that the use of online 'trials' is a trend which is becoming increasingly common.

Automatic CV readers that hunt for keywords

These tests are not the only way in which computer systems are used to hire people. The days of employers reading through a stack of 400 CV are mostly long gone, replaced by key word recognition systems. For example a job advert that requires a need for previous management experience would hunt for words like 'manager' 'experience' and 'management' in close proximity to one another in an applicant's CV.

This is not the first revelation about how employers use the internet, after it was discovered that companies asked for the Facebook passwords of potential candidates. Social media websites such as Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter have changed the way people look for jobs, with people looking for work advised to make sure their profiles do not contain any inappropriate content.

Daniel Nolan, managing director at theEword says: "This is a very interesting development in the ever changing way in which people find work. With every available position now in hot demand it was inevitable that systems like this would be introduced eventually"

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