X Factor style TV show to discover new technology

Wed 3rd of October 2012, filed under Internet News

Simon Cowell project to create technology jobs

Simon Cowell is reported to be considering a new programme in the style of the X Factor with a technological twist. Alongside rapper will.i.am, it seems Cowell wants to discover new ideas and create technology jobs for inventors and entrepreneurs who may otherwise struggle to get funding. While the name of the programme has not been confirmed, it is rumoured to be The X Factor for Tech.

The rapper, who has previously appeared on BBC's X Factor rival The Voice said: "Singing and performance create a couple of jobs, but this will create lots. It's about getting in touch with youth and giving them a platform to express themselves." The idea has been warmly welcomed by much of the technology community, who have seen the many success stories created by Cowell on his various projects.

Search for the new Bill Gates

Bill Gates and the late Steve Jobs have already introduced the concept of celebrity into the world of technology, with these individuals becoming so synonymous with Microsoft and Apple respectively that they are equally as recognisable as their products. This is the kind of impact Simon Cowell is hoping for with his programme, discovering the next genius who will become known the world over for their ideas.

The deputy chief executive officer for Tech City Investment Organisation, Benjamin Southworth, added his support to the proposal: "Anything that garners attention to the work being done by young people to create work is a wonderful thing. Tech has always had its fair share of celebrity anyway [with] headline characters like Steve Jobs. "

Kleon West, business development manager at theEword commented: "This is an exciting prospect for anyone with an interest in technology. Simon Cowell always ensures his projects are successful, and if this programme goes ahead it is very likely to find some fantastic ideas to benefit us all."

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