Twitter announces new survey tool for advertisers

Thu 4th of October 2012, filed under Social Media

#asktwitter

Twitter has unveiled Twitter Surveys, a new advertising tool for brands and marketers.

The social network announced the innovation in an official blog post yesterday, and has been developed in collaboration with market analysis specialist Nielsen. Users will see a tweet from @TwitterSurveys in their timeline, asking them to complete a survey. Clicking the link will cause the tweet to expand, so the user participates within Twitter rather than being redirected to another site - which Twitter calls a 'native experience'. Twitter Surveys will appear in both desktop versions and mobile apps.

However, the surveys are not designed to promote a particular product or service, but instead to help marketers understand the success of their campaigns. Brand Strategy vice president Joel Lunenfeld said:

"It will give brands better insights to determine purchase intent, overall awareness, and other advertising metrics and analytics that can lead to greater engagement on Twitter."

Monetising the millions

Twitter Surveys is the latest innovation the company has launched in an effort to advertise to its vast membership. The prevalence of mobile and desktop apps such as Hootsuite and Tweetdeck means advertising has to be 'native', i.e. integrated with Twitter's core service. To this end, Promoted Tweets and Trends were announced in April 2010. However, many brands also choose to use Twitter celebrity endorsements, which don't generate any money for Twitter itself.

Of course, it is not yet clear whether Twitter Surveys will boost funds for the company either - many sources report the tool will be a free extra for high-spending advertising partners.

Natalie Booth, online marketing manager at theEword, said: "Measuring the success of a campaign is vital for any advertiser as it determines ROI. This is especially true of a platform like Twitter where brand awareness and engagement are the key metrics, so Twitter Surveys may be ideal for ascertaining these factors."

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