RSS LinkedIn Google Plus

Call us: 0800 014 9884

The usual suspects: Predictable Google results


Visibility is everything

A recent study has revealed that internet encyclopedia Wikipedia appears on the first page of results for 99 per cent of Google searches. While this is an extreme case, it is not the only website to be a familiar sight on search engine results pages (SERPs). Facebook, LinkedIn, 192.com, FreeIndex and Google’s own products could all be considered part of this category, to some extent.

Does this mean that the availability of high rankings is limited? For every spot nabbed by a dominant ‘all-encompassing’ website, that means one less place available for specific brands to battle over.

In the infinite tangle of information that is the online world, visibility is everything. It represents both practical success and perceived success – which are equally important in the world of business.

For example, websites which have achieved a high-ranking position in search results are statistically far more likely to be visited by internet users. Whether or not these sites manage to retain visitors, encourage repeat visits and convert page views to sales is another matter – but stumbling on to a website in the first place is indisputably the key to the entire process.

Meanwhile, in perception terms, people remember the brands they see the most – just as in traditional advertising – and often grow to trust them. This alone can result in more direct searches, visits and transactions.

Not all Wiki pages are truly useful

The revelation about Wikipedia came from analytics agency Intelligent Positioning, which used a random noun generator to search for a thousand different keywords via Google. A Wikipedia page appeared in 99 per cent of all page one results; 96 per cent of top five results; and 56 per cent of number one results.

Intelligent Positioning’s ensuing analysis raises some important questions about this level of dominance, with particular reference to Google’s high esteem for fresh and unique content.

“We know that Wikipedia is a vast site with millions of pages and thousands of editors offering unique vital content on multitudes of subject matters,” it states. “But should Wikipedia be the de-facto resource for pretty much all subjects? Surely some pages are riding on the back of other quality pages or perhaps lazy references to the site from businesses and bloggers across the internet.”

As noted here, Wikipedia can often be very useful, producing the answers that a searcher is seeking. However, the SEO authority it has gained for its great pages is no doubt bumping up the rankings of its poor ones, thereby pushing down more specific websites which may be more relevant or informative.

Liane Baddeley

[Screen capture: Intelligent Positioning.]

Written by Liane Baddeley
james_riches_swap

Pinterest targets male market with Guided Search update Monday 26th of January, 2015by James Riches Pinterest has made changes to its search results in order to appeal to its growing male market. The number of men using Pinterest reportedly rose by 73 per cent last year.

More on this story »

Microsoft net profits fall despite sales boost Tuesday 27th of January, 2015by Andy Williams Despite strong console, tablet and cloud technology sales, Microsoft reported its profits fell by 10.6% in Q3 2014, hitting its net income of $5.86bn.

More on this story »

Apple breaks corporate profit records Thursday 29th of January, 2015by Dan Moores The Californian tech giant reported third-quarter profits of $18 billion (just short of £11.9 billion), having sold over 74 million iPhones in those three months – at an average rate of 34,000 handsets per hour.

More on this story »
theEword - 34 mins ago

Google reacts following Yahoo’s search market increase: http://t.co/D5QJDQ6DXl

Reply Retweet Favourite
theEword - 3 hours ago

Twitter’s Group DMs are the internet’s best new secret meeting place: http://t.co/VtNCQ5T55W

Reply Retweet Favourite
theEword - 1 day ago

Snapchat has a secret new way to add friends: http://t.co/9MKKZcJukh

Reply Retweet Favourite
theEword - 1 day ago

Microsoft net profits fall despite sales boost: http://t.co/p6z4o455FF

Reply Retweet Favourite
theEword - 2 days ago

Ten digital marketing lessons we learned in 2014 that we need to remember this year http://t.co/g2iUeRK9QP

Reply Retweet Favourite

theEweekly Wrap: 16 Jan Friday 16th of January, 2015by Andy Williams This week: Marketing growth falls during final quarter of 2014, Facebook set to invade the office and Ryanair to offer passengers in-flight streaming to their devices.

More on this story »

theEweekly Wrap: 23 Jan Friday 23rd of January, 2015by Dan Moores This week: Microsoft shows off Windows 10, Google challenges right to be forgotten, and Twitter introduces catch-up feature.

More on this story »
daniel_nolan_swap

Ten digital marketing lessons we learned in 2014 that we nee... Tuesday 27th of January, 2015by Daniel Nolan What are the things successful marketers must not forget in 2015? This blog explores ten things 2014 taught us that we need to remember this year.

More on this story »

Who loves theEword

Who loves theEword Who loves theEword